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Whale in the Bath: Teaching Notes

whale-in-the-bath
Whale in the Bath
Kylie Westaway
Illustrated by Tom Jellett

Read the Review.

Whale in the Bath: Question Time!  

Before Reading:
Ask some silly questions, like ”Would you ever find an elephant in your toilet?”, ”Would you find a polar bear in your fridge?”.  Encourage children to think of their own examples and write them down.
Look at the cover. Did you think a whale could fit in a bath? Do you think this might be a true story or make believe? What do you think the boy might say to the whale? What would you say to the whale?  
whale in the bath titles

During Reading:
Ask, Do you know what krill is? Do you believe Bruno? Do you think he really had a bear under the bed and a walrus in the backyard? Do you think the whale has nice manners? Can you wash like a whale? (Do the actions).  

After Reading:
Do you think Ally sees the whale or is she making it up? Why do you think Bruno’s family didn’t believe him? Why do you think Bruno didn’t want to have a bath? What would you do if someone didn’t listen when you asked them to do something? Have you ever tried to avoid something you didn’t want to do? What happened?  

Writing.
– Using the ideas listed prior to reading, write a new title about a large animal in a small item. For example, ”Hippo in a Teacup”. Illustrate to create a front cover.
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– Using the above front cover, write a new story about yourself trying to use the item that the animal is sitting in. What was it doing in there? Why doesn’t it want to get out? What would you say? What do your family say?
– W is for whale. Make a list of words that begin with ‘Ww’. Encourage children to copy or trace some of these words. Accompany each word with a picture to represent it.
– Make a paper model of one of the ‘w’ words. Eg. paper whale (see Art / Craft), walrus, window, etc.
– Write an alliteration sentence with ‘w’ words. Eg. Wally Whale wondered why the water wasn’t warm. Illustrate.  

Reading.
– Read other books about whales.
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– Find and write a list of verbs associated with the word ”splash”, in a whale template.
Alternatively write adjectives to describe the whale, or nouns listing the items he used in the bath.  
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Mathematics.
– Measurement: Length. How big is a Blue Whale?
Objectives: Children understand the size of a Blue Whale. Practice predicting and measuring skills.
Materials: roll of string (100 feet or 30.5 metres), Blue Whale picture, pencils, large butcher paper, corridor or outdoor area, paper plates.
1. Research and write measurements of the Blue Whale on the picture.
2. On large butcher paper, draw the head of the whale, as life size as possible. Do the same with the tail.
3. Have children draw eyes, mouth, scales onto the head and tail.
4. Mount the head at one end of the corridor, then stick (or tie) the end of the string to the head.
5. Unravel the string (30.5m) and attach with the tail.
6. Children predict how many paper plates (and/or other materials) it would take to fill the entire length of the whale. Write estimates, measure and record.
7. Discussion: Who’s prediction/s was closest? Refer back to book. Compare and contrast – Would it be possible for this whale to fit in a bath? A car? A house? What else might be as big as a Blue Whale?
(Activity adapted from www.teachervision.com/science/lesson-plan/2548.html)  

– Find a range of online whale maths games and videos at the following site:
https://www.learninggamesforkids.com/animal-games-whales.html  

Science.
– Research facts about the Blue Whale (use size measurements in Maths activity above). Present as a booklet, poster or visual technology presentation.
Some information can be found at: www.animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/mammals/blue-whale/
Learn all you wanted to know about blue whales with pictures, videos, photos, facts, and news from National Geographic.  
blue-whale-pictures_3

Art / Craft.
– Look at the illustrations by Tom Jellett. Draw cartoon style pictures and paint with cool, earthy tones.
– Download these awesome drawing and colouring activities by Tom Jellett, found at:
http://kyliewestaway.com.au/fun-stuff/colouring.     
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– Make your own Paper Plate Whale.
How cute is this one from Krokotak! We made our own using one paper plate, textas and some gold paper! Simple and adorable!
Instructions here: http://krokotak.com/2014/07/a-paper-plate-whale/ .    
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– And this Blue Whale Paper Toy:
http://krokotak.com/2013/03/blue-whale-paper-toy/
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– Crayon Relief Whale.
Materials: crayons, watercolour paint, water, paintbrush, paper, googly eyes and glue (optional).
Directions: 1. Draw a large whale with crayon and colour in as desired.
2. Dab water in to the watercolour paint to form a runny mixture, and paint over the entire sheet of paper.
3. Notice the crayon wax resisting the water. Allow to dry.
4. Glue on a googly eye/s (optional).    
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– Crayon Fun in the Bath!
Have a whale of a time and be creative in the bath with some bath crayons. You can easily make your own.
See instructions here: http://m.wikihow.com/Make-Soap-Crayons  
760px-Make-Soap-Crayons-Step-6

General.
– Find a range of whale activities, including literacy, mathematics and crafts, on Kylie Westaway’s Pinterest page:
http://www.pinterest.com/kyliewestaway/whale-in-the-bath  
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Lessons created and adapted by Romi Sharp 2014.
All sourced resources have been credited.
These lessons are for personal or classroom use only and not permitted for commercial use.
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